22 September 2009

Speed Blogging

  • Lake Mead is half full, Lake Powell is half full. Why not slow evaporation by putting all the water in one of them?

  • Multinationals are planning for water shortages that may expose them to serious risk, but their efforts are sometimes dismissed as greenwashing. IBM, meanwhile, is bringing IT to water, hoping to make money from an increasing need for good water management.

  • Saunas and steam rooms are good for you if they make you feel good (and you aren't at risk...)

  • A lie or an ad? "Economists at Dartmouth College has discovered that ski areas report 23 percent more new snow on weekends, but, unsurprisingly, "there is no such weekend effect in government precipitation data."

  • "Corporate America has begun to grapple with a challenging question: How do you quantify the risks associated with climate change?.. .95 percent of [Levi-Strauss's] offerings are made from cotton. Climate-related water shortages threaten cotton supplies, to say nothing of the tornadoes and floods that could threaten the company's cut-and-sew operations in Bangladesh, Cambodia, Vietnam and other countries."

  • "This study investigates the impact of corruption on public and private investment in African countries as a way of exploring one channel through which corruption undermines growth. The empirical results indicate that corruption affects economic growth directly and through its impact on investment. We find that corruption has a negative and significant effect on domestic investment and that corruption affects public and private investment differently. The results indicate that corruption has a positive effect on public investment while it has a negative effect on private investment. The positive association between public investment and corruption supports the view that corrupt bureaucrats seek to increase capital expenditure (over maintenance expenditures) to maximize private gains (rent-seeking). In contrast, the results confirm that corruption discourages private investment, suggesting that corruption increases the costs of doing business while raising uncertainty over expected returns to capital. The results support the view that corruption hampers growth and call for institutional reforms to improve the quality of governance as a prerequisite for achieving investment-led growth. "
hattips to JWT and DW

6 comments:

John Fleck said...

I look forward to the process of reopening the Colorado Compact to renegotiate the issues needed to make possible your idea of storing all the water in one or the other of the big reservoirs. I really mean that. As a journalist, seeing that can of worms opened up would guarantee a lifetime of stories!

J said...

Evaporation is a function of water surface, winds, temperatures, reelative humidity of the air, etc. I am far from certain that storing the water in one big reservoir would reduce losses.

Fixed Carbon said...

Regarding cotton and water, could we not simply increase subsidies to Texas cotton farmers? This would counter the trend toward socialism that the Governor of Texas is concerned about.

WaterSource/WaterBank said...

No doubt about it, ... everybody is a water expert ... never mind that they seldom provide any numbers ...

Powell presently has in storage 15,532,000 AF with a water surface area of 115,600 acres and is releasing 10,100 cfs daily.

Mead is presently evaporating 2000 AF/day. The historic Colorado River through Glen Canyon before the dam had an estimated evaporation rate of 227,000 acre feet per year.

In just 35 years, power from Glen Canyon Dam has saved the equivalent of burning 63 million tons of coal and the release of 320 billion pounds of carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere.

Do real numbers matter ... not to the "water experts" !

J said...

It would be nice to yhave some data on the geometry of the Powell and Mead reservoirs, and to graph Depth vs Surface.

WaterSource/WaterBank said...

J, All data is available for all Bureau reservoirs.