22 April 2009

The Water Cone

In response to this post on the 884 million people without access to "adequate water delivery," HR mentioned this interesting device. It looks low-tech and reliable, but I wonder about daily yield....

Here's the description:
Based on evaporation levels of 8.8 Liters per square meter (average solar irradiation in Casablanca, Morocco), the WATERCONE(r) (with a base diameter of 60 - 80 cm) yields between 1.0 to 1.7 Liters of condensed water per day (24 hours). The salty / brackish Water evaporates by way of solar irradiation and the condensation from that Water appears in the form of droplets on the inner wall of the cone. These droplets trickle down the inner wall into a circular trough at the inner base of the cone.
They have won many prizes for the device, so they have acknowledgement. Now let's see if they get market penetration...

Bottom Line: Clean water doesn't need to cost an arm and leg!

2 comments:

WaterSource said...

DZ,

Looks like you found a winner here ! The very short video on watercone.com is worth watching.

Gone now are the excuses that everyone in the world cannot have clean water to drink. Relief agencies ... are you listening ?

Now if you could only figure out a way for NV & CA to investigate a fresh water Source that could be developed to deliver 325,900,000,000 gallons a year without power and store it in the available air space in Lake Mead ... Maybe they would put you in charge of fees and usage ... you would be sharp enough to distribute the resource equitably. Maybe Captain Founder would like to help ...

WaterSource waterrdw@yahoo.com

Philip said...

These have been in use for decades as survival equipment in lifeboats (now probably superseded by a fancier device, especially because it would be very unusual to be marooned in a lifeboat for weeks on end). I think they can make a few liters a day. There is a good account in the amusing "Life of Pi" of the protagonist using such devices.

I'm not sure how well they'd scale. Probably not too well, or we'd have seen some large ones somewhere. An engineer (not me) could possibly explain why that is so.