19 November 2008

Teaching Bleg

I got this yesterday:
I teach an undergraduate course on natural resource economics, and I've got somewhere between 1 and 2 weeks currently devoted to water issues. I've been using Tietenberg's chapter on the subject, augmented by a couple of chapters from Haddad's book on California water markets, and the Wikipedia article on Riparian water rights. Any suggestions for a couple of readings that would improve the interest level and the quality of the content? I'd love to have a good non-technical article on aquifer depletion, for example.
I suggest looking through the archives of this blog using keywords (aquifer, McCloud, groundwater, depletion).

While scanning the archive, I realized that we understand things by looking at them from different angles and in different layers. If I were this teacher, I'd tell the students to search this blog (or WaterWired) and then write a one-page summary (with links!) on aquifers, depletion, etc.

If you have suggestions, please leave them in the comments (with links, if possible).

3 comments:

Philip said...

Another great resource is the site of the Water Education Foundation: http://www.watereducation.org/
For many years they have done an excellent job of describing the many Western water "issues" in balanced and succinct terms. They do not advocate for anything. I believe they are trusted across the wide spectrum of views.

CJ Brooks said...

Another good source of readings on GW depletion is Robert Glennon's book "Water Follies". He presents the material in an entertaining and not too demanding fashion. The whole book could be easily read, but it might be more meaningful to just take 2 or 3 of his case studies as discussion material.

John Fleck said...

I am, by coincidence, currently taking an undergraduate natural resource economics class, also using Tietenberg. Our discussions have benefitted immensely from applying the concepts to our local situation. Makes it a lot more relevant.