08 July 2008

GE Likes Subsidies

H-Water has a post on a GE "white paper" [registration required] on policy options for water reuse and recycling.

Here's my reaction:
I read the executive summary. This marketing document is devoted to encouraging "solutions" that use equipment that GE manufactures. It is NOT a comprehensive document on water policy options.

It does say water reuse and recycling, but prices --- my favorite tool -- are only mentioned only in the sense of subsidizing reuse/recycling machinery.

Of particular interest is the historical intersection of emerging water technologies and corporate sustainable practices (or lack thereof).

The only thing sustainable is profitability (a standard I embrace); there's nothing here except an attempt to boost demand for GE services and products.

Because this document does not present a full-range of options, it is hard to know what decision is optimal. This piece is a waste of time for anyone other than a GE salesman.
Bottom Line: GE likes selling its stuff, and this "technical paper" is about selling stuff.

4 comments:

Bob Murphy said...

You are an unconventional fellow, David. You want to charge poor people for water, and yet you bash big corporations too.

Intriguing.

David Zetland said...

Hi Bob -- where did I say charge poor people for water?

I am not bashing GE; I am pointing out that there "technical" paper is merely sales prop/agit.

I'm willing to stick with unconventional, tho :)

Bob Murphy said...

Oh, I was mostly kidding about the poor people. But don't you think poor people should pay for water, just like poor people should pay for food and gas? Maybe they get public assistance, but the point is they should pay for these necessities, right?

David Zetland said...

It's politically infeasible to charge the poor for an initial allocation of water. The argument is that people will die without it (unlike gas; food is too heterogeneous -- and supplied by competing companies...)